Copy-SqlJob

In the last post on the dbatools module (https://dbatools.io) we talked about the Copy-SQLCredential. Using this previous cmdlet may need to be a prerequisite before using Copy-SQLJob.

The Copy-SQLJob will move SQL Agent jobs, including the schedule from one instance to another instance. This can be highly efficient if moving an instance from one server to another server. The only downside of this cmdlet is that it will copy the job with the exact same object id, which means that if you are trying to use this to duplicate jobs as a template will cause them to be linked on a single instance. This means that if you change a setting on one it will affect the other jobs copied from the same instance.

The syntax is as follows

Copy-SqlJob -Source SQL2012 -Destination SQL2016 -jobs NightlyMaintenance,HourlyTransactionBackups

Copy-SqlCredential

In the series on dbatools module (https://dbatools.io) we at are going to look next at the Copy-SqlCredential.

As you may or may not know, if a DBA is going to keep his database up to shape and continue to process ETL (Extract Transform and Load) jobs they need to leverage automation. One method that is provided by SQL is the Agent, which may have jobs that leverage all sorts of items (SQL, SSIS packages, even Batch and PowerShell Scripts). Most of these jobs can run as the service account running the agent, but in some cases (Batch and SSIS among others) a Credential and Proxy are needed to run these jobs.

In migrating from one server to another, the DBA may not have access to the passwords for the Credentials that exist to run certain packages. I found that the Copy-SQLCredential to be helpful for this. In addition, this can be leveraged in the following way with Copy-SQLProxyAccount.

Copy-SQLCredential -Source SQL2012 -Destination SQL2016 -Credential 'Domain\CredentialedAccount'
 
Copy-SQLProxyAccount -Source SQL2012 -Destination SQL2016 -Credential 'Proxy_CredentialedAccount'

 

Copy-SQLlogin

As I mentioned in my last post, I am going to be spending some time going over a couple of my favorite tools from the dbatools (https://dabtool.io) PowerShell module.

The one cmdlet that actually led me to the module in the first place, which has been a tried and true tool for me, is the “Copy-SQLlogin.” I am a relatively new to the work of a DBA, but one of the most difficult lessons I learned early on is that if you have a SQL Always On Availability Group (AG) setup the you have to maintain a copy of the Logins on all replicas where you need to potentially access the data from in a read capacity. From what I have read, to keep these groups in sync you would need to either grab the Login, “Create to Script” on the other replica or use partial containment to get around this problem.

This cmdlet however, offers a method similar to the first one, but with the options of syncing all of the Logins or only select Logins

My preferred method of using this command would be in the following syntax

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  Copy-SQLLogin -Source SQL2012 -Destination SQL2016 -Logins 'Domain\ServiceAccount','LocalSQLLogin'

This provides you the flexibility to copy the Logins for the databases that you may be moving. After doing this from the original source I would then switch the source and destination for the primary and any secondary replica in the cluster. One caviat that I found to this is that if you have another AG on the secondary that is not a readable secondary or is read-intent only this cmdlet may fail or provide a warning that not all the databases were available.

Another robust version of this cmdlet is just using it with the SyncOnly

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  Copy-SQLLogin -Source SQL2012 -Destination SQL2016 -synconly

This does not add or drop the user, but merely syncs up the objects securables. For Instances that are 2012 and newer this cmdlet can be used to move the SIDS, passwords, and other items. It makes it a powerful addition to any DBA’s tool belt.

dbatools

Recently I found myself responsible for a large database migration and knew I would need to make sure that the environment had the exact same setup as the previous systems and was setup and migrated as fast and as accurately as possible. As a Result I discovered dbatools (https://dbatools.io) which is a PowerShell module that provides some neat cmdlets for SQL Administration. This module can be installed on any recent version of PowerShell (v 4 and v5) from the PowerShell gallery via Find-module and Install-module.

The most helpful of the over 150 cmdlets are the following

  1. Copy-SqlLogin
  2. Copy-SqlCredential
  3. Copy-SqlJob
  4. Copy-SqlDatabaseMail
  5. Copy-SqlLinkedServer

In some of the following posts I will share how some of these are used.